Date of Award

7-1-1998

Degree Type

Thesis

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Social Work

Degree Name

M.S.W.

First Advisor

Dr. Gale Horton

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between the attitudes about death and dying among Vietnam veterans who are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. Essentially, does post-traumatic stress disorder have an impact upon their personal attitudes toward their own death? An original questionnaire was administered to examine the attitudes of the participants toward death and dying. The descriptive research design was utilized in this study to examine whether there was a significant relationship between the attitudes toward death and dying among Vietnam combat veterans diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

The sample in this study was thirty Vietnam combat veterans who are diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, who currently receive readjustment counseling at the Atlanta Vet Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The hypothesis indicated that there will be no statistically significant relationship between the Vietnam combat veterans' experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder and their attitudes toward death and dying. The researcher's original survey instrument, Attitude Toward Death and Dying Scale (ATDADS) was utilized to obtain the Vietnam combat veterans' experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder and their attitudes towards death and dying.

Findings indicated that there is a statistically significant relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder and the Vietnam combat veterans' attitudes toward death and dying. The conclusion drawn from this study demonstrated that it is imperative to address the bereavement needs of Vietnam combat veterans diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Signature Location_Supplemental file.pdf (45 kB)
Notice to Users, Transmittal and Statement of Understanding

Included in

Social Work Commons

Share

COinS