Date of Award

5-1-1979

Degree Type

Thesis

University or Center

Atlanta University (AU)

School

School of Education

Degree Name

Ed.S.

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of the study was to ascertain whether or not least effective and most effective teachers use the same skills and techniques in the management of their classes Classroom teachers responded to a sixty-two statement ques tionnaire on methods and techniques utilized in the manage ment of their classrooms. Participants responded on a per centage scale of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% usage.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES

The study was conducted in three urban DeKalb County public high schools. The population sample numbered sixtytwo teachers. Thirty-one of the teachers were classified as least effective and thirty-one teachers were classified as most effective. Principals' selection process of teachers being most effective or least effective was based on the system's "Summary of Teacher Appraisal."

Construction of the sixty-two item questionnaire was accomplished through the writer's extensive review of the literature, consultants, experts and teachers in the field of education.

The method used in analysing the data was the t-test sub-program version 6 available at Georgia State University Computer Center. The data were compiled to show the amount of use made of each technique within Group A (most effective teachers) and Group B (least effective teachers) and between Groups A and B.

FINDINGS

Based on the analysis of the data from the question naires, the teachers revealed significant differences on seven classroom management techniques at the ,05 level. The seven techniques were: 1) Periodically scanning one's entire class in order to ascertain what is going on in the room, 2) Supervising the class at all times, 3) Keeping the learning environment attractive and free from disorder, 4) Maintaining accurate records—attendance, current work samples, anecdotal records, etc., 5) Receiving the full attention of all students in the class before starting a lesson, 6) Assigning meaningful seat work, and (7) Using punishment as a method of control in the classroom.

Of the non-significant remaining fifty-five items, forty-eight revealed mean scores that were higher for the teachers classified as most effective; four revealed mean scores that were higher for the teachers classified as least effective and three items revealed mean scores that were the same for each group.

CONCLUSIONS

The study produced several conclusions. First, teachers classified as most effective were more task-orient ed and businesslike in their classroom efforts. Second, teachers classified as most effective put greater emphasis on planning instruction. Third, teachers classified as most effective put greater emphasis on well managed classes. Fourth, all of the teachers implemented instruction and com municated (verbal and non-verbal) at approximately the same level. Finally, the teachers classified as least effective used punishment as a method of control in the classroom.

RECOMMENDATION

That further study be made using a larger population on those items where teachers indicated utilizing a specific technique more than another technique, Local school admini strators re-evaluate their thrust in the matter of evaluating teachers in the area of classroom management techniques.

That the principal as the instructional leader of the school develop a continuous monitoring system whereby teachers who encounter difficulties in the area of classroom management be provided programs in helping them to become more productive within their instructional program.

That teacher training institutions put more direct emphasis on the area of classroom management training.

That state and local school systems encourage continuous research directed toward effective classroom manage ment skills.

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