Date of Award

7-1-2010

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Social Work

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Social Work and Public Health

First Advisor

Dr. Robert W. Waymer

Second Advisor

Dr. Richard Lyle

Third Advisor

Hattie M. Mitchell

Abstract

This descriptive and explanatory research design examines the most significant barriers and risks to prostate cancer prevention among African-American men in Georgia. One hundred and seven (107) men in Georgia were conveniently selected in varying settings to participate in a seventeen-question survey based on risk and barriers to prostate cancer prevention. The participants answered yes or no questions about family history of prostate cancer, knowledge of prostate cancer prevention barriers, previous diagnosis of prostate cancer, and previous participation in prostate cancer screenings. Men rated barriers based on medical professional interaction, culturally appropriate literature, family involvement, spiritual/religious involvement, attitudes towards screenings, perceived susceptibility, and financial influences to their participation in

prostate cancer prevention. This document adds to the body of literature by not only offering barriers and risk that have been stated in literature, but further rating of the importance of these barriers to African-American men and evaluation of some risk factors and comparing them to the male’s participation in prevention measures. Findings of the study indicate that there is a statistically significant relationship between the participation in prostate cancer prevention and the barrier of medical professionals discussing prostate cancer prevention with participants. However, there is no statistically significant relationship between the participation in prostate cancer prevention and the other six barriers to prostate cancer prevention. Findings of the study further indicate that there is a significant relationship between the risk factors of family history of prostate cancer and age. Conversely, there is no statistically significant relationship between participation in prostate cancer prevention and educational level. Large percentages (55.7%) of the participants have not participated in prostate cancer prevention in the last year. Further research should be conducted on the relationship between barriers and risk factors and future plans to participate in prostate cancer prevention. Additional future research should conduct a pre-test, discussion on barriers and risk, and a post-test to determine the difference in barriers and risks relationships with participation in prostate cancer prevention measures