Date of Award

7-1-2001

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Education

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. Claudette H. Williams

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between deans' leadership styles and faculty job satisfaction in Taiwan's system of higher education. The results of this study will help administrators to effectively lead their institutions toward educational reform in Taiwan.

This study utilized quantitative methods to determine the relationship between leadership styles and job satisfaction. A questionnaire was sent to 900 participating faculty members. Of the 900 questionnaires mailed, 631 (or 70.1 %) were returned. The independent and dependent variables were analyzed with Pearson Correlation and ANOV A statistical tools. The 0.05 level of significance was used to test the null hypotheses.

This study's results showed that there was a significant relationship between leadership styles and job satisfaction. There was also a significant difference between observed and expected leadership styles. Leadership style S3 (low tasklhigh relationship) was the most popular expected and observed leadership styles, followed by leadership style S2 (high tasklhigh relationship), leadership style S4 (low task/low relationship), and leadership style S 1 (high task/low relationship). However, faculty members expected a much higher relationship behavior in leadership style S3. In general, faculty members had a moderate level of job satisfaction. Significant difference was found between leadership styles and job satisfaction in terms of type of institutional governance, faculty gender, faculty size, faculty years of experience, and faculty age. There was no significant difference between leadership styles and job satisfaction in terms of type of administrator gender and institutional type. In leadership style S2, younger faculty members had significant lower extrinsic job satisfaction than older faculty members. In general, faculty members who served in larger faculty size institutions had higher job satisfaction than faculty members who served in smaller faculty size of institutions. In leadership styles S2, S3, and S4, faculty members who had lesser years of experience had significant lower job satisfaction than faculty members who had longer years of experience. In leadership style S3, females had significant lower job satisfaction than males. In leadership styles S2, S3, and S4, faculty members who served in public institutions had significant higher job satisfaction than faculty members who served in private institutions.

Signature Location_Supplemental file.pdf (45 kB)
Notice to Users, Transmittal and Statement of Understanding

Share

COinS