Date of Award

5-1-1991

Degree Type

Thesis

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Social Work

Degree Name

M.S.W.

First Advisor

Professor Hattie Mitchell

Abstract

The overall objective of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in African-American pregnant and non-pregnant teenagers perceived impact of teen pregnancy on self and significant other. To attain this objective, the following factors were addressed by the researcher: (1) parents' income, (2) attitude toward premarital sex, (3) attitude toward teen pregnancy, (4) family relationship, (5) peer relationship, (6) relationship with mother, and (7) importance of religion. This was a comparative study. Subjects were 10 pregnant adolescent females and 10 never pregnant females, ages 14 through 19, who attended North Clayton High School, in College Park, GA. A structured questionnaire was administered. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and are reported in terms of frequency and percentage. Cross tabulations were used to compare the relationship of the two groups. The results showed that for this sample population premarital sex and teenage pregnancy are regarded as personal choices. Regardless of income, family relationships, or importance of religion, adolescents tended to express a high level of social tolerance for both. The hypothesis that there is no significant difference in African-American pregnant teenagers versus non-pregnant teenagers perceived impact of teen pregnancy on self and significant others was rejected.

Included in

Social Work Commons

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