Date of Award

5-1-2001

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Political Science

First Advisor

Professsor Hashim Gibrill

Abstract

In recent years, West Cameroonians (Anglophones) have expressed deep concern regarding their relative deprivation in the political, social and economic realities in Francophone dominated Republic of Cameroon, particularly the widening gap which continues to manifest itself between the two entities since integration in 1972. This study examines the factors and circumstances (internal and external) responsible for fusion of the two polities, and the implications of such a union for the life experiences of Anglophone Cameroonians, particularly in the political, economic, social, and infrastructure domains. A case study analysis approach was utilized to analyze data gathered from Cameroonians at home and in the United States, as well as personal interviews. The researcher found that successive Francophone regimes used varied policies and strategies to reinforce the hegemonic nexus of East Cameroon (center) over West Cameroon (periphery). The conclusions drawn from the findings suggests that although Francophone policies and strategies are paramount in hindering anglophone progress in Francophone dominated Cameroon, there are, never the less, other salient factors which have combined to make this reality apparent.

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