Date of Award

5-1-2011

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Education

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. Trevor Turner

Second Advisor

Dr. Moses Norman

Third Advisor

Dr. Darrell Groves

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between instructional strategies/teacher methodologies on student performance: student achievement in mathematics and student behavior. The independent variables were administrativesupervision, lesson planning, instruction strategy designed to include differentiated instruction, flexible grouping, and teaching for higher order thinking skills, students’ response to creative and different instructional strategies, administrators’ supervision and postobservation conferences, administrators’ supervision, and faculty development workshops. The moderator variables were grade level, class size, students’ socioeconomic status, and teacher experience. The dependent variables were students’ achievement in mathematics and student behavior.

Data were collected from ten schools and a total sample of 51 teachers participated in the survey. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to summarize the data. The following statistical procedures were used: Pearson Correlation,and Multiple Regression Analysis. The data were presented in two parts, the statistical distribution of the variables to observe the extent of their variations, and the results and analyses of the statistical tests in response to the identified research questions. All of the statistical procedures were tested at the (0.05) significance level.

Findings showed that administrators’ postobservation conferences with teachers about the use of instruction strategy designed to include differentiated instruction, flexible grouping, and teaching for higher order thinking skills had the most significant relationship with student achievement in mathematics (r. = .586), whereas students’ responses to creative and different instructional strategies had the most significant relationship with student behavior (r = .5 90). Administrative supervision had no significant relationship with students’ achievement in mathematics (r. = .243) or student behavior (r. .183). There was no significant relationship between lesson planning and student behavior. There was also no significant relationship between the moderator variables: grade level, class size, students’ socioeconomic status, and teacher experience and students’ achievement in mathematics or student behavior.

Included in

Education Commons

Share

COinS