Date of Award

5-1987

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Atlanta University (AU)

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Administration and Policy Studies

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare and analyze higher education administrators' perceptions of the importance of trait-skills as necessary for effective leadership. A descriptive survey method compared and analyzed the perceptions of actual and potential higher education administrators in relation to the value and use of trait-skills. These perceptions were analyzed against demographic variables of age, sex, position, and by institutions. The t-test and pearson r correlation were employed in the analysis. The trait-skills items (TSI) a modified instrument from the (LBDQ, Stogdill, 1963) and the (TII, DuBrin 1963) were utilized to compare and analyze perceptions and role of the two groups on trait-skills and related variables. Three hypotheses used in the study stated, "There are no statistically significant differences in perceptions of the value of (1) compassion, (2) consideration (3) empathy-sympathy between actual and potential administrators.” The following conclusions appeared from the findings: 1. There was significant difference between the two groups on trait-skills beyond the .OS level. Examination of the mean scores suggested the potentials had significantly more of trait-skills than the actuals. Therefore the null hypotheses were rejected. 2. There were differences on trait-skills by sex of respondents. The females were significantly higher in trait-skills as shown by the mean scores. 3. The relationships between trait-skills and the variables of institution, age, and position examined separately through Pearson r correlation analysis were highly significant beyond the .05 level. The correlations suggested that higher levels of skills existed among the undergraduate colleges, older respondents and administrators in junior positions. The following recommendations derived from the findings are offered: 1. More female employees should be added to make for effective leadership or, male administrators should be trained and educated on the use of trait-skills. 2. Actual and senior administrators should be made aware of the importance of continuing to practice trait-skills. 3. Actual and potential administrators in Atlanta University and Clark College should be provided with orientation on the value of trait-skills.

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