Date of Award

12-1-1974

Degree Type

Thesis

University or Center

Atlanta University (AU)

School

School of Arts and Sciences

Degree Name

M.A.

History

Abstract

The primary intent of this paper is to examine the attitudes of Presidents Harding, Coolidge and Hoover towards Blacks. An attempt has been made to state the issues affecting Black during the period of 1920-1932 and what action each president took regarding the issues.

Principal factors affection the lives of Black Americans included: The Dyer Anti-lynching bill: discrimination in the federal government; the rise of the Ku Klux Klan; Black participation in politics and more. Although these issues were brought to the attention of the presidents, however, positive action was minimal. They showed little, if any, regard for Blacks of Black aspirations. Their constant disregard only added to the disillusionment of Blacks in the Republican Party and abandonment of continued support. The lessons learned from each administration showed that Blacks cannot rely upon one party as an adequate guarantee of fulfillment of their rights.

The main sources of information were addresses of the presidents; the collected works of Calvin Coolidge; biographical works, and the New York Times. Secondary sources included a wide variety of books and periodicals.

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