Date of Award

5-1-2008

Degree Type

Dissertation

School

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. Sheila Gregory

Second Advisor

Dr. Moses C. Norman

Third Advisor

Dr. Darrell Groves

Abstract

This study examined 10 nontraditional women at a small two-year institution. The study illuminated the challenges that these women faced as they matriculated and explored personal, professional, academic, institutional, financial resource, peer relationship, and professor relationship factors that they perceive could and has affected their attrition rates. The findings emerged from a host of dominant themes that were generalized at the inception of the study. The participants mostly provided a clear understanding of their perceptions relative to the themes. Therefore, the participants' responses provide an understanding of the relationships that the themes do or do not have to the participants' contribution to the studied institution's attrition rates. 1 The implications drew upon the research to bring forth a cause and effect understanding of the findings that if heeded could assist in decreasing the attrition rates for African-American female students. The recommendations were brought forth in an effort to provide a guiding post for future practices, policies, and research relative to understanding and adhering to the needs of nontraditional African-American female students.