Date of Award

6-1-2007

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Department of African-American/Africana Women's Studies

First Advisor

Dr. Josephine B. Bradley

Abstract

This study examined the issue of sexism in the Black Church, as it impacts the level of participation of women not only as church members, but also as pastors. This practice of gender discrimination is, in reality, theological sexism. This study was based on the fact that there existed and continues to exists a separation of power related to gender discrimination of women who seek equal positions as pastors within the Black Church structure, thereby eliminating the stained glass ceiling. This is a case study based on fifteen interviews with both male and female pastors and churches in the Greater Metropolitan Atlanta and Theological academicians at local seminaries. The research revealed that both male and female pastors acknowledged that theological sexism does exist within the Black Church. The response of women has been to establish their own churches. Also, there is a rise in the number of husband/wife pastors with the wife serving as co-pastor. However, the Black Church has yet to acknowledge its established guidelines for changing the practice of theological sexism.

Share

COinS