Date of Award

12-1-1989

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Department of Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. William Denton

Abstract

This study investigated the effectiveness of the Prescription Learning Program (PLP) and its impact on the reading achievement of second grade students in the Atlanta Public Schools. The intent of this study was to examine the PLP in order to determine implications for administrative and instructional decisions. The study posed the following questions: 1. What are the effects of the Prescription Learning Program on the reading achievement of second grade students as measured by the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills? 2. What are the effects of the Prescription Learning Program on improving student motivation as related to the instructional program? 3. What are the effects of teacher acceptance and utilization of the Prescription Learning Program on the reading achievement of second grade students? 4. What are the effects of the implementation practices and procedures of the Prescription Learning Program on student reading achievement at the second grade level? 5. Is there a difference in the reading achievement of students participating in the Atlanta Public Schools model technology sites and of those in the regular program as measured by the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills? The study encompassed the use of the descriptive survey technique. Three questionnaires were designed by the researcher to survey the opinions of students, teachers, and administrators. Test data from the second grade Iowa Tests of Basic Skills was used to measure student reading achievement. Analysis of the data was made by using the T-test to determine the statistical difference between the means of the Pre-PLP and Post-PLP reading achievement test data. The Chi-Square statistical tool was used to analyze total frequencies obtained from the survey instrument administered to second grade students. The major conclusions that resulted from the study are as follows: 1. The results of the 1989 reading achievement section of the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills showed significant gains for students who were actively involved with microcomputers as an instructional tool. Basal reading objectives were correlated with software programs developed by the PLP. This correlation of objectives and student interaction with the computers did promote significant gains in reading for second grade students in the model technology program. 2. All null hypotheses related to student motivation were accepted. Students are positively stimulated by interaction with the computer. All 300 students surveyed stated they enjoyed using the computer. 3. The intervening variable of teacher acceptance did make a significant difference in student achievement as measured by the 1989 ITBS results. Students in schools categorized as low in acceptance reported a negative gain of -4.8 on the ITBS, while students in schools categorized as high in acceptance reported a gain of 2.3. 4. The variations in implementation practices and procedures did not significantly impact student reading achievement at the second grade level. 5. Test data analyzed from the (1989) ITBS revealed significant reading gains for the students in the model technology program. A difference in mean scores for the 1988-89 school years indicated a reading gain of 2.9 for students in the model program and a -0.6 decrease for students in the regular program.

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