Date of Award

12-1-2012

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Education

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. Barbara Hill

Second Advisor

Dr. Moses Norman

Third Advisor

Dr. Trevor Turner

Abstract

Hip-Hop educational research is critical to understanding the plight of black boys in public schools throughout the United States. This qualitative inquiry fills a void in the research literature that often fails to include the emic perspectives of the participants involved. To confront the challenges black male youth face in school studies that capture their salient voices about lived-experiences are crucial. Nonetheless, this critical ethnography provides a praxis for educational practitioners to use to gain valuable insight into the minds of school age black males. This study contributes to the canon of educational research by situating hip-hop culture and its various elements as independent variables that have a direct impact on black male youth and their attitude in school. This study is also different in that it adds three additional components to hip-hop culture that include fashion/style, language, and behavior. Historically, these three elements are discussed as a part of the four cornerstones: DJing, Rapping/emceeing, Breakdancing, and Graffiti Art. However, this investigation isolates these three as separate elements that should be included in discussions about hip-hop educational research due to their profound influence on the current generation of black male youth in public schools throughout the United States.

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