Date of Award

7-1-1982

Degree Type

Thesis

University or Center

Atlanta University (AU)

School

School of Education

Degree Name

Ed.S.

Department

Educational Leadership

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between parental academic guidance, reading habits exhibited in the home, parental level of aspiration for the student, and the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)—verbal and mathematic—scores for a selected group of students. Hypotheses: The following hypotheses were tested: H1: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT-Verbal scores and parental academic guidance. H2:There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT-Verbal scores and reading habits exhibited in the home. H3: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT-Verbal scores and parental level of aspiration for the student. H4: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT-Math scores and parental academic guidance. H5: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT-Math scores and reading habits exhibited in the home. H6: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT-Math scores and parental level of aspiration for the student. Method: A selected group of subjects who took the SAT in October, November and December of 1981 was studied. The Home Influence Factor Questionnaire (HIFQ) was developed, by the researcher and psychometric experts to quantify the data. The HIFQ was administered to the selected group of subjects simultaneously after school by the researcher. The HIFQ was scored by the writer. The Pearson Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation was utilized to test the null hypotheses at the .05 level of significance. Findings: 1) The degree of correlation between SAT-Verbal and parental academic guidance was -.291326. 2) The degree of correlation between SAT-Verbal and reading habits exhibited in the home was -.074411. 3) The degree of correlation between the SAT-Verbal and the parental level of aspirations for the student was .039179. 4) The degree of correlation between the SAT-Math and parental academic guidance was -.346094. 5) The degree of correlation between the SAT-Math and reading habits exhibited in the home was -.142485. 6) The degree of correlation between the SAT-Math and parental level of aspiration was -.223689. Conclusions: The findings from this, study seem to warrant the conclusions listed below. Each null hypothesis is listed separately. 1) The null hypothesis: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT verbal scores and indices of parental academic guidance. The hypothesis was rejected (r = -.291326). 2) The null hypothesis: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT verbal scores and indices of home reading habits. The hypothesis was accepted (r = -.074411). 3)The null hypothesis: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT verbal scores and indices of parental level of aspirations. The hypothesis was accepted (r = .039119). 4) The null hypothesis: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT mathematical scores and indices of parental academic guidance. The hypothesis was rejected (r = -.346094). 5) The null hypothesis: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT mathematical scores and indices of home reading habits. The hypothesis was accepted (r = -.142485). 6) The null hypothesis: There is no statistically significant correlation between SAT mathematical scores and indices of parental level of aspirations The hypothesis was accepted (r = -.223689). Implications: The conclusions drawn from the findings of this study seem to warrant the following implications: 1) The subjects experienced a conflict between their parents' academic guidance and their performance on the verbal part of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. This fact may occur because of the nature of the adolescent. 2) A conflict was also revealed between subjects' parental academic guidance and performance of the mathematical part of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Again, this may have occurred because of the nature of the adolescent. Recommendations: The implications inherent in the conclusions drawn for this study seem to warrant the following recommendations: 1) That parents provide academic guidance for the student early during school years and allow more freedom in choices of courses and occupations when the student becomes an adolescent. 2) That parents study the causes of the conflict between their children's performance on the Scholastic Aptitude Test and the academic guidance provided by the parents and adequately adjust this academic guidance so they supplement or compliment each other.

Included in

Education Commons

Share

COinS