Date of Award

7-1-2013

Degree Type

Dissertation

University or Center

Clark Atlanta University(CAU)

School

School of Education

Degree Name

Ed.D.

Department

Educational Leadership

First Advisor

Dr. Sheila Gregory

Second Advisor

Dr. Barbara Hill

Third Advisor

Dr. Darrell Groves

Abstract

The role of the full-time, live-in professional staff member is one of critical importance to college and university communities, especially as it relates to the management of the co-curricular, holistic living and learning experience that is to be provided within an on-campus residential facility. Thousands of students undertake the collegiate experience each year, and the full-time, live-in professional staff assumes the critical role of "pseudo parent" for these students that have now come to call their college campuses home. The responsibilities are major and the impact of the full-time, live-in professional staff upon students under his or her supervision can be profound.

Consequently, just as it is important to cater to the vast array of needs presented by students, it is just as important to underscore the well-being of the full-time, live-in professional staff member. A mixed-method study investigating the factors that influence employee morale of full-time, live-in professional staff at two single-gender institutions of higher education was the central focus of this research investigation. To understand this phenomenon, there were fifteen variables under study that undergirded the basis of this research, and they were as follows: workload, employee recognition, gender, staff camaraderie, staff professional development, residential climate, leadership style of the supervisor, stress, employee expectations, marital status, years of experience, salary, age, staff support systems, and the number of student conduct incidents.

The conclusions that resulted from the findings of this study emphasized that morale was based upon an individual's personal perspective and feelings related to a particular situation or circumstance. The quantitative data demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between gender, staff camaraderie, residential climate, leadership style of the supervisor and salary as it related to employee morale. Further, the qualitative data from the interviews revealed mixed viewpoints related to the influence of workload, employee recognition, gender, staff camaraderie, staff professional development, residential climate and the leadership style of the supervisor as it related to employee morale. As a result of the findings, the implications, recommendations and limitations were discussed at length to underscore both the quantitative and qualitative data.

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