Date of Award

January 1939

Degree Type

Dissertation/Thesis

Abstract

Standing on what, in many respects, appears to be the threshold of another Great European conflict, it has become increasingly necessary that we acquire a deeper understanding of the fundamental political, economic and nationalistic forces which led us into the last World War. As a result of such understanding it is hoped that international sympathy will be increased and the men of state will profit by the errors of their predecessors. More specifically, within this brief treatise it is purposed to relate the contribution which the Macedonian Reform Question made to the development of as well as the hostility between the two camps of European alliances. In relating the events connected with this intricate subject no attempt is made to place all responsibility for bringing about the hostile separation on any one Power, but the idea is to set forth clearly the facts as they were recorded by the men of state. The story is told, as much as possible, by allowing each Foreign Secretary, Foreign Minister or diplomat to speak for himself. Since no one statesman had a priori knowledge of all the concocted schemes of Europe, it is assumed that in most instances each was working for what he thought was the best for the interest of his country at that particular time. It is not expected that this work will represent an altogether new treatment of the question. It is maintained, however, that a much fuller treatment of the subject is given here than exists at present. It is hoped that after perusing these pages the reader will have a more accurate estimation of Macedonia's importance in European politics.

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