Date of Award

5-4-2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

Department

Sociology

Abstract

This study explores the factors that influence how students at Spelman College form their online identities on social media sites (namely Facebook). In consideration of the history of the stereotypical images of black women in the media and the rise of black women creating counter narratives through the use of the web, this study explores how both of these instances effect the development of an online presence for black, female millennials. As an exploratory study, this investigation specifically explores: (1) What factors influence social media usage for black, female millennial students at Spelman College?, (1 A) How does perception of the representation of black women in the media influence social media usage for black, female millennial students at Spelman College,2) How does the intersectionailty of identity (primarily gender, race) affect the development of online identities on social media sites for black, female millennial students at Spelman College?, (3) How do students resist and/or uphold social constructs of gender and race, through their social media profiles? This cross-sectional study uses surveys, semi-structured interviews, and content analysis to explore the aforementioned questions. The results from the study suggest that one's social location of being a black woman directly influences how one navigates identity on Facebook.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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